Sustainable Homesteading

 We make conservation doable at home.

 

Self-sufficiency and a low ecological footprint are a household's first line of defense against environmental and social instability. 

 

Organic Gardening

ORC maintains a model organic household vegetable garden to showcase sustainable methods of diet enhancement, disaster preparedness, and budgeting.  From seed, we have grown eggplant, tomato, okra, pepper, mung beans, string beans, bok choy (pechay), malunggay (moringa) trees, and lots and lots of basil, to name a few. We use carbonized rice hull in all our garden beds; the slow burning of a pile of rice hull waste from the inside out is recognized as a stellar method of transforming agricultural waste into a valuable soil additive. Additional components of our beds include pig and carabao (water buffalo) manures, soil, and vermicompost. For extra plant nutrition and health, we make fertilizers from fermented fruit, plants, fish offal, and rice. Both garden and household are watered by rainwater catchment using split bamboo for drain pipes.

Ocean-Action Resource Center
Ocean-Action Resource Center
Ocean-Action Resource Center

Making organic fertilizers (FAA-Fish Amino Acid)

Carbonizing rice hull

Go to Gallery

Vermiculture

ORC keeps a worm box and “worm bags” (rice sacks) containing African Nightcrawlers (ANC), tropical earthworms with proven value as a fertilizer producer. As we are a mostly vegetarian household, our worms have lots of fruit and vegetable peelings to enjoy, and they live comfortably in bedding of decomposed rice hay or soaked and shredded cardboard. We have used their droppings (vermicast) in our garden from day one. It is amazing how quickly they convert organic waste into usable fertilizer... and how quickly they reproduce!

 

Contact us if you’d like to give some of our worms a new home. Prices should not be prohibitive, so just talk to us if you're interested.

Ocean-Action Resource Center
Ocean-Action Resource Center

Go to Gallery